Runtime Parameters Documentation for FLASH Release 4.6.1


physics/materialProperties/Conductivity
    useConductivity [BOOLEAN] CONSTANT [FALSE]
        flags whether the conductivity material property is being used

physics/materialProperties/Conductivity/ConductivityAniso/Constant
    cond_constantCross [REAL] [0.0]
        Valid Values: Unconstrained

    cond_constantParallel [REAL] [0.0]
        Valid Values: Unconstrained

    cond_constantPerpendicular [REAL] [0.0]
        Valid Values: Unconstrained


physics/materialProperties/Conductivity/ConductivityMain
    useConductivity [BOOLEAN] [TRUE]
        flags whether the conductivity material property is being used

physics/materialProperties/Conductivity/ConductivityMain/Constant
    cond_constantIsochoric [REAL] [1.0]
        Valid Values: Unconstrained


physics/materialProperties/Conductivity/ConductivityMain/Constant-diff
    diff_constant [REAL] [1.0]
        Valid Values: Unconstrained


physics/materialProperties/Conductivity/ConductivityMain/PowerLaw
    cond_DensityExponent [REAL] [0.0]
        Valid Values: Unconstrained

    cond_K0 [REAL] [1.0]
        Valid Values: Unconstrained
        coefficient K0 for conductivity K = rho c_v K0 T^n , where n is given by
        cond_TemperatureExponent.
    cond_TemperatureExponent [REAL] [1.0]
        Valid Values: Unconstrained
        Temperature exponent n. For n=0 you get constant conductivity. See D.
        Mihalas & B. W. Mihalas 1984 p 551. For n=6, e.g., you get nonlinear
        conduction as in Fig 103.1(b) there.

physics/materialProperties/Conductivity/ConductivityMain/PowerLaw-gray
    Raddiff_K0r [REAL] [1.0]
        Valid Values: Unconstrained

    Raddiff_TemperatureExponent [REAL] [0.0]
        Valid Values: Unconstrained

    cond_K0 [REAL] [1.0]
        Valid Values: Unconstrained
        coefficient K0 for conductivity K = rho c_v K0 T^n , where n is given by
        cond_TemperatureExponent.
    cond_TemperatureExponent [REAL] [1.0]
        Valid Values: Unconstrained
        Temperature exponent n. For n=0 you get constant conductivity. See D.
        Mihalas & B. W. Mihalas 1984 p 551. For n=6, e.g., you get nonlinear
        conduction as in Fig 103.1(b) there.